Next Stop: The World!

visited_countries.php

A huge part of our business is providing geo-referenced approach plates, airport diagrams, and our own original Seattle Avionics Airport Diagrams for many apps and devices (Bendix-King, Dynon, Aspen, AFS, GRT, etc.).  We’ve had US, European, and Australian data for several years but, for this data cycle, we substantially increased our coverage by adding more than 4,000 approach plates, airport diagrams, SIDs, STARs, etc. for Brazil, Venezuela, Israel, and UAE (United Arab Emirates).  Plus we added complete Mexican VFR map coverage in this same data cycle (and the Bahamas not too long ago).  Many more places are in the works.  In fact, our current coverage area (image above) includes a whole lot of the places where folks fly.

If you’re using an app or device that accepts our European data, you’ll see these four new regions right now.   And, if you’re using the Bendix-King xVue Touch (or several other devices shortly), you can even use our incredible (and patent-pending) Slingshot wireless feature to get the data almost instantly transferred from FlyQ EFB.

VZBrazilUAEIsrael

 

10 thoughts on “Next Stop: The World!

  1. Good news – “Next Stop: the World!”

    But what about Canada? Am aware of NavCanada fees for access to data – would like to see another effort by Seattle Avionics to solve this problem. Foreflight has somehow been able to deliver a reasonably priced solution – it must be possible. Would appreciate anything you can do.

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    • Hi Lee. Totally agree with you. Here’s the thing – nav Canada has a different pricing model than any other country we work with. It’s incredibly expensive per user unless you get a lot of users of just want to throw $ away because they charge one very large fee regardless of the number of users. Other countries either charge a reasonable flat rate price or have a per user price. That said, we are working on it.

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  2. What would be helpful is to be able to transfer a flight plan created on the AOPA site to your Ipad app. Much easier under the new system to file and print a flight plan on AOPA. Then final step could be to add to FlyQ.

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    • Hi Jon. No doubt that using a web-based flight planner with a large screen, mouse, and keyboard is MUCH easier than using an iPad to plan. Hence, our incredible FlyQ Online system. It’s VASTLY better than AOPA’s flight planner as it includes a 3D terrain profile view, a timeline so you can see how weather will change during flight, automatic fuel stop planning (based on lowest fuel prices), auto routing based on Victors, Jets, or recently cleared ATC IFR routes, export to many panel systems, and much more. Obviously file and print, etc. Super slick and auto-syncs with FlyQ EFB so nothing else to do. See one of the many videos about it we have on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/oLAXzR1KhnE?list=PLWyP7vLQFiagIe_N_mTjnDmP7NEnqgCNj

      Try it at (after watching the video):
      https://FlyQ.seattleavionics.com

      I’d really give that a spin first — it’s really so much better than AOPA’s. That said, if you find you like AOPA’s better for some reason, it has a feature to email a flight plan to yourself so you just open the email on your iPad and click a link in the email to import into FlyQ. Of course, you miss the wind optimization, auto fuel stop planning, ATC routing, etc.

      Thanks, Steve

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